7 Email Prospecting Mistakes That Cost You Money

Email is still the strongest sales and marketing tool out there even though it’s been around far longer than social media. There are a few things you can do to become better at it though. Here are some things to avoid when using email to prospect…

1. Poor subject line

Research has shown that a question or a targeted statement followed by an ellipsis … is the most effective way to capture someone’s attention.

2. Misleading subject line

This approach usually results in your prospect quickly deleting your email once they discover than you have mislead them.

3. Using a generic email

If you want to stand out from your competition your email needs to be personalized to each prospect. You can achieve that goal by stating a potential problem they may be facing or by presenting a problem you solved for another client in the same industry.

4. Too much focus on their company

If you create a compelling message that demonstrates you have insight to a problem they are encountering and you can demonstrate that you might have a solution, you are more likely going to receive a reply.

5. Too long

Remember, your goal with an email to arouse curiosity and to get a reply or schedule a telephone or face-to-face call.

6. Weak call to action

An effective email ends with a specific call to action. “Mr. Smith, I will call you on Tuesday at 10:15 AM to see if our solution can help you…”

7. No follow-up

It is critical that you make contact afterwards, preferably by telephone.

via 7 Email Prospecting Mistakes That Cost You Money.

In coaching I generally use email to prospect speaking engagements. I also follow the Call-Mail-Call rule where I avoid leaving a voicemail and *67 to block my identity so that I can call back multiple times without looking like a stalker. I hope you can use these tools to get that next lead much easier!

Need more chicken soup for your biz? Follow me on Twitter, friend me on Facebook or connect with me on LinkedIn –and let’s talk!

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